Charlotte W. Newcombe Fellowship

 

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of ethical or religious values in all fields of the humanities and social sciences, and particularly to help Ph.D. candidates in these fields complete their dissertation work in a timely manner. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature.

Applications now closed.

The Awards

Newcombe Fellows receive $30,000 for 12 months of full-time dissertation writing. (No half-year or partial awards are allowed.)

  • 21 non-renewable fellowships of $30,000 will be awarded in the spring of 2022.
  • Fellows’ graduate schools will be asked to waive tuition and fees while maintaining health insurance for Newcombe Fellows.
  • Fellows become part of a network of more than 1,300 Newcombe Fellows leading the way in their various fields.

Important Dates

Notification of Status (Finalist & Non-Finalist)
March 2022

Fellows Notified
By Early April 2022

Term of the award
Chosen Fellows will serve the tenure of the Fellowship from September 1, 2022-August 31, 2023

Eligibility

Eligible applicants for the 2022 Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship must:

  • be candidates for Ph.D. or Th.D. degrees in any field of study in the humanities and social sciences at accredited graduate schools in the United States. Candidates working on D.Min., law, Psy.D., Ed.D. and other professional degrees are not eligible.
  • have completed all pre-dissertation requirements fulfilled by the application deadline November 15, 2021, including approval of the dissertation proposal.
  • be in the writing stage of the dissertation. Usually, this means that fieldwork or other research is complete and writing has begun by the time of the award.
  • must expect to complete the dissertation between April 1, 2023 and August 31, 2023.
  • have never held a similar national award for the final year of dissertation writing. Applicants who have won such awards as the AAUW, Ford, NAEd/Spencer, Mellon/ACLS, or Mellon-CES fellowship are not eligible.
  • be in a humanities or social science department, writing on topics where ethical or religious values are a central concern.
  • Prior applicants who did not receive the award when they first applied may now reapply if their revised timeline meets Newcombe Fellowship guidelines for completion and defense.

New This Year

  • Candidates will ideally expect to complete and defend their dissertation before August of the fellowship year. Recognizing, however, that various factors may affect a Fellow’s defense/graduation timeline, the Newcombe Fellowship allows leeway of up to one academic year after the academic year for which the fellowship is granted. For instance, a Newcombe Fellow who receives the fellowship in the spring of 2022 will hold the fellowship in the academic year 2022-23 and will ideally have completed and defended the dissertation by August of 2023. If the Fellow’s circumstances make this timeline impractical, they will complete and defend the dissertation by the end of the academic year 2023-2024. Funds are awarded for the Fellowship year only and should be expended in that year; there will be no additional Newcombe funding would support additional time. 
  • Understanding that dissertation completion timelines may change or extend for various reasons, the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation and the Institute for Citizens & Scholars have revised their previous re-application policy. Prior applicants who did not receive the award when they first applied may now reapply if their revised timeline meets Newcombe Fellowship guidelines for completion and defense. Applicants who have already received funding from another national award for dissertation writing may not apply. 

Conditions

  • Newcombe Fellows may not accept other awards which provide similar benefits, including fellowships such as the AAUW, Ford, NAEd/Spencer, Mellon/ACLS, or Mellon-CES fellowship. In rare cases, with the written permission of the director of the Newcombe Fellowship program, the Newcombe award may be combined with another award that offers some benefit uniquely significant to the Fellow’s project (for instance, access to international archives), provided that the funding associated with the award in question does not exceed 75% of Newcombe Fellowship funding. The Newcombe Fellowship may be supplemented by funding associated with additional local/institutional awards, however no combination of additional awards may exceed 75% of the Newcombe stipend. Any supplemental funding must receive the written permission of the program director.  

  • The Newcombe Fellowship is intended to support doctoral students as they devote full-time effort to supplementary research activities and dissertation writing. With the understanding, however, that teaching, writing, research assistantships, or other paid work may support the development of a well-rounded curriculum vitae, Fellows may undertake up to 12 hours per week of paid work during their tenure of the Fellowship. Any such work must be in an area related to a Fellow’s field and/or specific to the Fellow’s doctoral research and career preparation (including teaching, research assistant positions, editorial work for a journal, etc.). The director of the program must provide written authorization for any such work. Permission to work beyond the 12 hours per week limit or to work in an area not related to the Fellow’s academic field must be authorized by the program director. 

CONTACT US

2021 CHARLOTTE W. NEWCOMBE FELLOWS

Marzouq Alnusf • Northwestern University, philosophy
Global Racial Capitalism: How Race Matters to Global Justice

Nathaniel Berndt • Duke University, history
Descendants of Zabarkan, Citizens of the World: A History of Cosmopolitan Imagination in Decolonizing Niger, 1958-1974

Valerie Black • University of California, Berkeley, anthropology
Dehumanizing Care: An Ethnography of Mental Health Artificial Intelligence

Shannon Brick • CUNY Graduate Center, philosophy
Rehabilitating Authenticity

Erez DeGolan • Columbia University, religion
Affect in Power: Public Joy in Roman Palestine and the Lived Experience of the Rabbis

Amanda Joyce Hall • Yale University, history & African American studies
Triumph: Grassroots Activism against Apartheid and the Global Challenge to Anti-Black Racism, 1971-1991

Omar Hammad • Rutgers University, New Brunswick, media studies
Digital Islam: The Emergence of Muslim Counterpublics on Social Media

Anusha Hariharan • The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, anthropology
“In Solidarity”: Feminist Friendship, Care and Ethical Life in Southern India

Gili Kliger • Harvard University, history
Colonial Reformation: Religion, Empire, and the Origins of Modern Social Thought

Abby Kulisz • Indiana University, religious studies
Sacred Friendship, Holy Hatred: Christian-Muslim Encounters with the Book in the Medieval Middle East

Tatiana Llaguno Nieves •New School for Social Research, politics
Paradoxes of Dependence: Towards a Political Theory of Our Dependent Condition

Gana Ndiaye • Boston University, anthropology
“Plastic Migrants”: Race, Performance, and the Making of a Senegalese Muslim Community in Brazil

Alexis Riley • University of Texas at Austin, theatre and dance
Patient Acts: Performance, Disability, and the Making of Mad Memory

Kevin Rose • University of Virginia, religious studies
Living Green: The Neoliberal Climate of Protestant Environmentalism

Sherri Sheu • University of Colorado Boulder, history
“Parks for the People”: The National Park Service and the Long 1960s

Aaron Stamper • Princeton University, history
Reconfigured and Remade: A Sensory History of Islamic Granada’s Reformation as a Civitas Christiana, 1474-1614

*Alex Steers-McCrum • The Graduate Center, CUNY, philosophy
What Does “Native” Mean? Disentangling and Decolonizing Settler Terms and Categories
*Robert M. Adams–Charlotte W. Newcombe Fellow in Philosophy

Raffaella Taylor-Seymour • University of Chicago, anthropology & comparative human development
Intimate Rites: Localizing Queerness through Ancestral Spiritualities in Contemporary Zimbabwe

**Claire Urbanski • University of California, Santa Cruz, feminist studies
On Sacred and Stolen Lands: Desecration and Spiritual Violence as United States Settler Colonialism
**Carpenter/Newcombe Fellow

Tara Weinberg • University of Michigan, history
Land ‘Bonds’: Imaginaries of Property Ownership in South Africa, 1900-1994

Karolina Wisniewska • University of Arizona, philosophy
Identity, Inequality, Injustice

Kristine Wright • Princeton University, religion
Bodies of Light and Knowledge: Mormon Women, Religious Authority and Theologies of Health

Frequently Asked Questions

A: Yes, foreign citizens may apply if they meet the following criteria:

  1. They are enrolled in a doctoral program at an American university located in the United States.
  2. They have completed all pre-dissertation requirements.

A: No. Only students currently enrolled in a graduate program in the U.S. are eligible to apply.

A: Understanding that dissertation completion timelines may change or extend for various reasons, the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation and the Institute for Citizens & Scholars have revised their previous re-application policy. Prior applicants who did not receive the award when they first applied may now reapply if their revised timeline meets Newcombe Fellowship guidelines for completion and defense. Applicants who have already received funding from another national award for dissertation writing may not apply.

A: Ph.D. and Th.D. candidates may apply if all pre-dissertation requirements are met, if ethical or religious values are central to their dissertations, and they can reasonably expect to complete their dissertations between April 1 and August 31, 2023. 

A: The Fellowship is open to doctoral candidates, which means that a doctoral student has fulfilled all of the institutional and departmental criteria prior to writing the dissertation. The requirements for candidacy may vary between institutions and departments—some require a language exam, others do not; some may require a proposal defense, others may not. Candidacy is determined by each department’s individual criteria. A departmental administrator can tell you whether or not you have advanced to candidacy.

A: No, applicants who have held a similar national award for the final year of dissertation writing, such as an AAUW, Ford, NAEd/Spencer, Mellon/ACLS, or Mellon-CES fellowship, are not eligible. Any award supported by a national funder, even if it is subsequently allocated by a local institution, is considered to be a national award. In rare cases, with the written permission of the director of the Newcombe Fellowship program, the Newcombe award may be combined with another award that offers some benefit uniquely significant to the Fellow’s project (for instance, access to international archives), provided that the funding associated with the award in question does not exceed 75% of Newcombe Fellowship funding. The Newcombe Fellowship may be supplemented by funding associated with additional local/institutional awards, however no combination of additional awards may exceed 75% of the Newcombe stipend. Any supplemental funding must receive the written permission of the program director.

A: Sometimes, yes, but there are restrictions which must be discussed with the Newcombe Program Officer.

A: No. Eligibility is limited to candidates in the social sciences and humanities, working toward a Ph.D. or Th.D. degree. Candidates must be enrolled in an American doctoral program, at a graduate school located in the United States. Candidates working on D.Min., JD, Psy.D., Ed.D. and other professional degrees such as business or business management are not eligible.

A: You may apply to both without affecting eligibility. Simply submit the two different online applications, with separate supplemental items, transcript, and recommendation letters.

A: The online application, doctoral transcript, supplemental items (cover sheet, abstract, proposal, bibliography, timetable and C.V.), and three letters of recommendation. This document provides a template as well as additional, valuable information.

A: The bibliography is primarily to show the source bases for your research, which is also why an explanatory note is optional in the bibliography. Use the sources that will best show the selection committees that you are prepared to complete the scholarship that you describe in your proposal.

A: The purpose of the timetable is to demonstrate to the selection committee that you are truly in your FINAL year of dissertation writing. The committee members will be looking to see that you have completed your research sufficiently and begun to write the dissertation. Use this template for the timetable, you may then use paragraph/narrative form, or bullet points, or a combination of the two for further explanation.

A: The fields of study listed in the application reflect the fields in which the Newcombe competition has selection panels. If you do not see your precise field listed, choose the field most closely aligned with your work. For example, if you are in a classics department, decide whether your particular project should be read as art history, early world history, philosophy, or world literature.

A: You should ask the person who is directing your dissertation and two additional faculty recommenders. (A co-director may be listed as a faculty recommender.) The two faculty members may be from your own institution or department or a different institution or department.

A: If a recommender declines your request to provide a recommendation, you will be notified via email by Tech-Help. You will then need to return to your application and replace the recommender.

A: If the recommender in question has not submitted a letter, go to the Recommendation section of your application and use the trash icon to remove the recommender. You can then enter the contact information of the new recommender and click Send Invitation.

If the recommender in question has already submitted a letter, no change is possible.

Should one of your recommenders inform Tech-Help@woodrow.org that they decline to provide a recommendation, you will receive an email from Tech-Help advising you to replace a specific recommender.

A: If your recommender has not received your request, please ask them to check their spam/junk folder in case it has been blocked by their IP address or by their personal email preferences.  If they do not find it, you can return to the Recommendation section of your application and click the Resend Invitation button under the appropriate recommender.

A: Yes. Labeling the files correctly will ensure all of your documents are associated with your application. Please refer to this document for correct labeling. Please note that it is also in your best interest to communicate the importance of correct labeling to the Professors who are submitting Letters of Recommendation.

Application Information

A complete Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship application consists of these required components:

  • a submitted online application (applications for the 2022 competition will open in fall 2021);
  • the online submission of the required supplemental items PDF files (See this template for the proposal document, which provides greater detail.);
  • doctoral transcript; and
  • three (3) letters of recommendation.

Please note:

  • All document submissions must be properly labeled. Incorrect file labeling may delay the processing of the application.
  • Inquiries may be directed to newcombe@citizensandscholars.org.
  • The deadline for ALL components of the application is November 15, 2021 11:59 p.m. ET. It is strongly recommended that all components be submitted at least one day prior to the application deadline, to ensure the documents have been received.
  • You will be able to login and return at any time to your account to edit your personal information, change your password, start and/or complete your application, and verify receipt of supplemental items.
  • If all components are not received by deadline, the application will be incomplete. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

A. Go to the application site. It is recommended that you save the Web page as a bookmark. Please remember your username and password.  If you decide to apply for any additional C&S programs, you must use the same login credentials for each program,

B. Create an account and fill out the required information. A completed application consists of the application form, letters of recommendation, and required supplemental items.  The form must be completed, supplemental items must be uploaded, and recommendations must be received PRIOR to submitting the application.

C. Click the SUBMIT button before November 15, 2021, 11:59 p.m. ET.

A. Obtain a copy of your doctoral transcript. The transcript may be official or unofficial for the initial submission. Finalists will be required to submit an official transcript. Save it/all pages into a single PDF file, correctly labeled.

B. Prepare the proposal document, which includes the cover sheet, abstract, proposal, bibliography, timetable, and C.V. (See this template for the proposal document, which provides greater detail.) Save into a single PDF file, correctly labeled.

C. Click on the Supplemental Items section of your application, upload the transcript and the proposal document by clicking on the Upload File button for each item.

A. Select recommenders who can attest to your scholarly competence and quality. We recommend that letters be personal and submitted specifically for the Charlotte Newcombe Fellowship. Generic or outdated letters do not typically strengthen an application. One of your recommenders must be your Dissertation Advisor.

B. Click on the Recommenders section of the application.

C. Complete the recommendation waiver at the top of the page.

D. Provide contact information for each recommender on the bottom of the page. For recommendations being sent through INTERFOLIO ONLY, enter the name of the Recommender and tech-help@citizensandscholars.org as the email address. Interfolio letters will be uploaded for you once received by our office.

E. A request for recommendation will be emailed directly to each recommender, asking them to register with the site and complete the recommendation form. This process will happen as soon as you enter contact information and click Send Invitation.

If a recommender declines your request to provide a recommendation, you will be notified by email. If you receive a “decline” notification, you will need to return to your application and complete a new recommendation request with a different recommender.

You will be able to track receipt of your letters of recommendation in the Recommenders section of your application. It is your responsibility to follow up with your recommenders to ensure that they have submitted their online recommendation prior to deadline, November 15, 2021, 11:59 p.m. ETWe strongly recommend that Letters of Recommendation be submitted as early as possible to ensure they are received prior to deadline. Keep in mind that you will not be able to submit your application until the recommendations have been received.

Once the recommendation letters have been received, and you have completed your portion of the application, click on the Submit button.

Application Important Dates

Deadline
November 15, 2021, 11:59 p.m. EST

Notification of Status (Finalist and Non-Finalist)
March 2022

Fellows Notified
By Early April 2022

Public Announcement of Fellows
By Late April 2022

Term of the award
Chosen Fellows will serve the tenure of the Fellowship from September 1, 2022-August 31, 2023